Nourishing women and children with fish powder in the first 1000 days

Molly Ahern -

Angela Muyangana feeding the daughter of a local farmer, Barotse Floodplain, Zambia. Photo by Clayton Smith.

Poor nutrition during the first most critical 1,000 days of a child’s life—­­­­from conception through pregnancy and lactation to the child’s second birthday—can result in permanent developmental prob­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­lems. The Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in Malawi (2015-2016) and Zambia (2013-2014) show that 37 percent and 40 percent respectively of children under five years of age suffer from stunting, which results from chronic malnutrition.

Women in shrimp processing in Bangladesh: Challenges and ways forward

Paul Neate -

Cleaning shrimps, Khulna, Bangladesh. Photo by Felix Clay.

More than 1.4 million women are engaged in Bangladesh’s aquaculture sector. Yet they work mostly in low-status, low-paid and arduous jobs. For instance, 80 percent of casual laborers in shrimp-processing factories are women. In contrast, women make up less than 1 percent of managers in these factories.

High involvement, low benefit: Overcoming gender barriers in aquaculture in Indonesia

Cynthia McDougall -

Women on reconstructed fish ponds, Bireuen, Indonesia. Photo by Mike Lusmore.

Women make a significant contribution to aquaculture in Indonesia, yet they face more barriers in and receive fewer benefits from the sector than men. These are the findings of new case studies carried out by WorldFish and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) as part of the CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH). Closing this gender gap will enable the aquaculture sector to enhance women’s social and economic empowerment, and drive economic development in the country.