Evolving solutions for new horizons: Reflections on a conversation

Stephen Hall -

Small-scale fisheries in developing countries employ a larger workforce and produce more fish for poor consumers than large-scale production. Photo by Georgina Smith, 2012.

I was recently fortunate enough to attend Seaweb’s 10th International Seafood Summit in Hong Kong. Fortunate for two reasons. First, because I had the honor of addressing the conference in an opening plenary presentation. Second, because I got to listen to a remarkable array of talks exploring solutions for ensuring a sustainable supply seafood to meet the world’s growing demand and need.

Small-fish aquaculture feeds poor consumers and business growth

Stephen Hall -

Small-fish benefits both poor consumers and small to medium size fish farms. The catch, Bangladesh. Photo by WorldFish, 2006

Reflections from Stephen Hall, Director-General, WorldFish in response to Sam Eaton’s Scaling up: Vietnamese fish farms search for eco-friendly formula. Originally published on Center for Investigative Reporting blog, As aquaculture booms, make room for small fish.

Rio +20: Reflecting on progress for fisheries and aquaculture

Stephen Hall -

Large Tilapia cages near Alexandria, Egypt. Photo by Graeme Macfadyen (Poseidon), 2011

On the 20th Anniversary of the first Rio Earth Summit it is time to reflect on our progress in putting fisheries and aquaculture on sustainable footings and the lessons we have learnt so far

In 1987 the Brundtland Commission articulated perhaps the central global challenge of our age – how do we achieve development outcomes that meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs?