Sustainable Aquaculture: Five Strategies to Getting Growth Right

Richard Waite -

Source: Historical data 1950-2010:FAO. 2014. “FishStatJ.” Rome:FAO. Projections 2011-2050:Calculated at WRI, assumes 10 percent reduction in wild fish catch between 2010 and 2050, and linear growth of aquaculture production at an additional 2 million tons per year between 2010 2050.

A guest blog by Richard Waite of the World Resources Institute (WRI), Michael Phillips of WorldFish, and Randall Brummett of the World Bank.

The world’s appetite for fish is steadily growing. Finfish and shellfish currently make up one-sixth of the animal protein people consume globally. As the global wild fish catch peaked in the 1990s, aquaculture—or fish farming—has grown rapidly to meet world fish demand, more than doubling production between 2000 and 2012.

Investing in Aquaculture

Mike Velings -

Feeding fish, Bangladesh.

Mike Velings, founder and managing partner of Aquaspark, guest blogs about social-impact investing in small-scale aquaculture.

In August 2010, I attended a lecture by Stephen Hall on aquaculture in Chicago. To say the least, I expected the room of environmentalists to be uninspired given aquaculture’s subpar reputation.

We should all be feminists if we are serious about eliminating poverty

Ranjitha Puskur -

Pelekelo Mubuyaeta leaves her maize and sugar cane field at midday after working from 6am to prepare lunch for her family in the Barotse Floodplain, Zambia.

Ranjitha Puskur guest blogs on International Women’s Day about the need for gender equality for rural women in agriculture.

We are living in an increasingly unequal world. A recent UNDP report entitled ‘Humanity Divided’notes that while Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita in low- and middle-income countries has doubled since 1990, more than 1.2 billion people continue to live in extreme poverty.