Fish is an important building block for growth and development of children and nations

Andrew Thorne-Lyman -

Nurtition and health. Photo by Finn Thilsted.

Andrew Thorne-Lyman, Senior Nutrition Specialist at WorldFish and Adjunct Lecturer in the Department of Nutrition, at the Harvard University School of Public Health, guest blogs on the nutritional value of fish and its role in global development.

Since joining WorldFish, I’ve spent a great deal of time learning about the important role that aquaculture and fisheries play within the global food system and considering the possibilities for harnessing the sector to have even greater impact on human nutrition and health.

What’s all the noise about engaging men?

Gary Barker -

A man helping his wife to clean fish in Jessore, Bangladesh.

Gary Barker, International Director at Promundo, guest blogs about gender equality in development on International Rural Women’s Day.

Engaging men and boys as allies in gender equality has become the buzz phrase in development circles. Donors are asking for it. The UN is talking about it. Development program staffs want to get trained in it. But, what does it mean to “engage men and boys” in gender equality? And, how can we make sure it’s not just the next poverty alleviation fad?

Aquaculture does help the poor

Stephen Hall -

Woman showing fish caught from her pond in Khulna, Bangladesh.

Knowing whether aquaculture in developing countries helps the poorest in communities is an important question for development agencies who want to make pro-poor investments.

Historically, there have been two arguments that it does not.

First, to be a fish farmer you need to have a certain amount of wealth, so the poorest are unable to become producers. Second, aquaculture tends to produce larger, high-value fish that are too expensive for the poorest consumers.