High involvement, low benefit: Overcoming gender barriers in aquaculture in Indonesia

Cynthia McDougall -

Women on reconstructed fish ponds, Bireuen, Indonesia. Photo by Mike Lusmore.
Women make a significant contribution to aquaculture in Indonesia, yet they face more barriers in and receive fewer benefits from the sector than men. These are the findings of new case studies carried out by WorldFish and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) as part of the CGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systems (FISH). Closing this gender gap will enable the aquaculture sector to enhance women’s social and economic empowerment, and drive economic development in the country.

A fisher’s wise words: ‘If we protect the fish, we are protecting ourselves’

Tarah Doheny -

Pengly, a small-scale fisher from Khe village in northern Cambodia.
Cambodia's fisheries—some of the most diverse and expansive freshwater fisheries in the world—are under pressure from both population growth and rising demand for fish. As the need to protect these vital fisheries grows stronger, I meet one small-scale fisher who’s working to conserve fish stocks and combat illegal fishing in his rural village.