Small-fish aquaculture feeds poor consumers and business growth

Stephen Hall -

Small-fish benefits both poor consumers and small to medium size fish farms. The catch, Bangladesh. Photo by WorldFish, 2006

Reflections from Stephen Hall, Director-General, WorldFish in response to Sam Eaton’s Scaling up: Vietnamese fish farms search for eco-friendly formula. Originally published on Center for Investigative Reporting blog, As aquaculture booms, make room for small fish.

More fish – surely we just need to farm the sea?

Stephen Hall -

Molluscs are the principal farmed marine product: giant clam exclosure, Solomon Islands. Photo by Mike McCoy

Some of the threats posed by climate change can appear rather esoteric or abstract. One of these is ocean acidification – it is not immediately obvious why we should care. A recent paper by Sara Cooley and colleagues give a good example of why the threat of changing ocean chemistry matters.

Fish and nutrition – not all fish are created equal

Stephen Hall -

Drying Omena, Lake Victoria. Photo credit Patrick Dugan

It might surprise you to learn that fish are more similar to fruit and vegetables than they are to poultry, cattle, or any of the other animals we eat. At least, they are if you think about the variety of shapes and sizes that fish and fruits and vegetables come in. As foods though, the more important similarity is that these various types differ widely in the nutrition they offer. So as with fruit and vegetables, while admonitions to eat more fish are often heard, exactly what kind of fish you eat matters – especially if you are malnourished.