Nourishing women and children with fish powder in the first 1000 days

Molly Ahern -

Angela Muyangana feeding the daughter of a local farmer, Barotse Floodplain, Zambia. Photo by Clayton Smith.

Poor nutrition during the first most critical 1,000 days of a child’s life—­­­­from conception through pregnancy and lactation to the child’s second birthday—can result in permanent developmental prob­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­lems. The Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in Malawi (2015-2016) and Zambia (2013-2014) show that 37 percent and 40 percent respectively of children under five years of age suffer from stunting, which results from chronic malnutrition.

Nutrition-sensitive fish production in Bangladesh: Potential approach for Myanmar?

Quennie Rizaldo -

Women harvesting mola in Khulna, Bangladesh. Photo by Yousuf Tushar.

In Myanmar, fish is an important food in the diet, with an annual average national intake of 21 kilograms per capita. An increasing demand for fish has boosted aquaculture, which has grown rapidly in the last 20 years. However, there are geographical disparities in fish supply and consumption, with a low consumption of 8.5 kilograms per capita per year in distant, hilly and mountainous regions.