Aquaculture does help the poor

Stephen Hall -

Knowing whether aquaculture in developing countries helps the poorest in communities is an important question for development agencies who want to make pro-poor investments.

Historically, there have been two arguments that it does not.

First, to be a fish farmer you need to have a certain amount of wealth, so the poorest are unable to become producers. Second, aquaculture tends to produce larger, high-value fish that are too expensive for the poorest consumers.

We should all be feminists if we are serious about eliminating poverty

Ranjitha Puskur -

Ranjitha Puskur guest blogs on International Women’s Day about the need for gender equality for rural women in agriculture.

We are living in an increasingly unequal world. A recent UNDP report entitled ‘Humanity Divided’notes that while Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita in low- and middle-income countries has doubled since 1990, more than 1.2 billion people continue to live in extreme poverty.

Small-fish aquaculture feeds poor consumers and business growth

Stephen Hall -

Reflections from Stephen Hall, Director-General, WorldFish in response to Sam Eaton’s Scaling up: Vietnamese fish farms search for eco-friendly formula. Originally published on Center for Investigative Reporting blog, As aquaculture booms, make room for small fish.