Improved tilapia breeding program in Egypt: A year in review

Khaw Hooi Ling -

Nabil Ahmed Ibrahim, Scientist at WorldFish, uses a digital scanner to identify a fish, which is possible because a passive intregated transponder has been inserted under its skin.
WorldFish Scientist Nabil Ahmed Ibrahim uses a digital scanner to identify a fish that has been tagged with a passive integrated transponder. Kate Bevitt, 2016.

In 2016, WorldFish continued to selectively breed and develop the Abbassa improved strain of Nile tilapia, which ensures that Egyptian fish farmers can reap the benefits of faster-growing and hardier fish and have sustainable, thriving livelihoods.

Sustainable Aquaculture: Five Strategies to Getting Growth Right

Richard Waite -

Source: Historical data 1950-2010:FAO. 2014. “FishStatJ.” Rome:FAO. Projections 2011-2050:Calculated at WRI, assumes 10 percent reduction in wild fish catch between 2010 and 2050, and linear growth of aquaculture production at an additional 2 million tons per year between 2010 2050.

A guest blog by Richard Waite of the World Resources Institute (WRI), Michael Phillips of WorldFish, and Randall Brummett of the World Bank.

The world’s appetite for fish is steadily growing. Finfish and shellfish currently make up one-sixth of the animal protein people consume globally. As the global wild fish catch peaked in the 1990s, aquaculture—or fish farming—has grown rapidly to meet world fish demand, more than doubling production between 2000 and 2012.