Listen, someone important is trying to tell us something

Stephen Hall -

20130508

What do you learn when you ask people about their personal experiences with international assistance efforts and make a genuine effort to listen to their answers? What do they say when you ask which approaches have been most effective and which not? What does that tell us about how things should change? I read “Time to Listen: Hearing People on the Receiving End of International Aid” and found answers to these questions.

“She’s just the cleaning lady”: Reflecting on gender norms

Miranda Morgan -

Woman carrying home vegetables in Khulna, Bangladesh.

I had just arrived at our training venue in Dhaka and watched as the manager stood at the top of the stairs, screaming orders at the woman rushing around to help me. When I expressed my distaste for his behavior, he smiled and said, “Don’t worry. She’s just the cleaning lady”.

Development in difficult places – how do we reach the billion people that have been left behind?

Stephen Hall -

Barotse floodplain, Zambia. Photo by Georgina Smith, 2012.

Researchers, development practitioners and policy makers recognise that efforts during the 1970’s and 80’s to develop new high yielding hybrid seeds and transfer them to farmers played an important part in removing the spectre of widespread starvation, especially in Asia. This, combined with the introduction of fertiliser and efforts to develop markets, also ushered in a period of cheap and relatively stable prices for the world’s staple crops and brought millions of farmers out of poverty. Aptly named The Green Revolution this undoubted success deserves celebration.