Women in aquaculture: Dr. Mary Lundeba

Bonnie Waycott -

Sorting fish as part of aquaculture in Zambia efforts.
Dr. Mary Lundeba (left) and research assistant Esther Lee sorting fish in northern Zambia. Photo by Chosa Mweemba.

Aquaculture in Zambia is a significant industry, contributing around 30,000 metric tonnes, or 27 percent, of the country’s total fisheries production. Despite this, more efforts to farm fish are needed, as the lack of production is a major cause of Zambia’s low fish consumption, says Dr. Mary Lundeba, a WorldFish scientist and field researcher.

Nourishing women and children with fish powder in the first 1000 days

Molly Ahern -

Angela Muyangana feeding child of Namakando Mubiana, local farmer, Barotse floodplain, Zambia. Photo by Clayton Smith.
Angela Muyangana feeding the daughter of a local farmer, Barotse Floodplain, Zambia. Photo by Clayton Smith.

Poor nutrition during the first most critical 1,000 days of a child’s life—­­­­from conception through pregnancy and lactation to the child’s second birthday—can result in permanent developmental prob­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­lems. The Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in Malawi (2015-2016) and Zambia (2013-2014) show that 37 percent and 40 percent respectively of children under five years of age suffer from stunting, which results from chronic malnutrition.